Freshwater Tissue Co. has announced the end of their plans to start up the Samoa Pulp Mill. The death of the pulp mill has been announced before.  We will be watching.  Our plan is to keep this blog up until the smokestacks go down and until the site is cleaned up. 



Ex
9/28/2010 06:15:35 am

As said ,,,,,foolishly before,,,,,,,,
But in the end ,,,I,m good with that .

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BoBby Shits
9/28/2010 06:24:45 am

Thanks for 2 years of hangin on.
You SOB,,

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Shawn
9/28/2010 07:35:05 am

You will be waiting a while. Last I heard, Bob's plans to sell off the boiler involved converting it to a biomass boiler and running it on site. If it is running I am fairly sure that the stack will stay up and clean up will be only of the area not in operation.

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Not Bob
9/28/2010 10:37:32 am

I just can't say how this blog is the death of the city.

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Not A Native
9/28/2010 10:42:14 am

YAHOO! and congradulation Carol.

I've heard Simpson has already been "shopping" around other uses for the building. I hope he proposes something thats both economic and clean. I'll line up behind him if he offers a good idea. Otherwise its back to the ramparts.

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Patrick
9/28/2010 11:55:11 am

My reason for taking part in this blog is personal: I can see the mill's tall stack from my front porch and when it is running I can experience a definite degraded difference in my neighborhood's air quality. Maybe some people would call this 'selfish' but after 50 years of more-or-less selfless social activism I feel I've earned the right to a little 'not-in-my-backyard'ism. Air quality wise, West Eureka is a pretty pleasant place to live without the mill running. Of course there's Fairhaven and 101 traffic emissions; but quanitatively and in terms of numbers of specific HAPs emitted they don't compare (Fairhaven does not appear on California's Top 10 Toxic Release list as the Samos Mill always does). Short of choosing to live in the wilderness, a person has to decide where, personally, one will draw the line. My line is the Samoa Pulp Mill. So I'll stay on this blog and watch what happens--until things are absolutely clear.

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dedicated westender
9/28/2010 05:50:39 pm

Thanks Carol for all your research and day-by-day tracking of this saga that the local news media chose to black out and try to keep us all uninformed. Keep it going until it is a remediated site ready for a new use or uses that benefit the communities around. I will be checking in regularly.

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dedicated westender
9/29/2010 04:40:27 am

I just read the Times Standard front-page article on the permanent closure of the Pulp Mill. I was interested to learn that the folks that have been waiting for the mill jobs to come back are mostly employees of over 40 years. If that is true, I am asking why the mill did not give them a retirement income. What about the union? Did it ever try to get a retirement plan in place???

Seems very strange to me but I am willing to be educated on this subject.

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Ex
9/29/2010 05:01:46 am

I dont think the statement of most had 40 years is acurate. Atleat for me and most I know,We were more like 10-20 years average . To young still for retirement . The union was a weak one. And Evergreen skipped out on the warren act, And med bills. So at 50 something we move to find work it appears. There is some retraing through EDD,But we burned up savings doing that .And now EDD has run out at the same time the mill plan came to an end.
To many of us counted on Simpson that I know of. OUR BAD.

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Not A Native
9/29/2010 01:36:41 pm

No one is happy that people's lives have been suddenly upended. All I can write is that I've been there too and know its difficult. I don't know what particular skills a 10 year mill worker has acquired but I'm sure they're useful for other work. While the pay may be lower, there seems to be a constant need for people with mechanical abilty.

The WARN Act requires 60 days notice of closing. Thats helpful at the time, but wouldn't make much difference today, two years after the mill was shut down.

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Mill worker (to not a native)
9/30/2010 12:49:55 am

We have recieved a judgement in our favor concerning the warn act and separation pay,but have been advised collecting the pay is a differant matter.Lee and Mann,the parent company, broke all ties before the mill was shut down.

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Weaver
9/30/2010 02:25:59 am

You mill workers need to put a lien on the mill again. Don't let your union get suckered again. The mill is worth something, enough to pay for the retirements of the workers anyway.

Eventually the mill will be dismantled, LP will pay for it, and your payments will be figured into that, IF you put a lien on it.

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to weaver
9/30/2010 02:34:51 am

what fantasy world are you in? The retirement fund is not in jepardy. all we are owed is separation pay. collecting it would require lawer fees that may exceed the monies recieved. Such as Carol, I am assuming, is about to face.

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